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Refuge

  • Dates: October 1, 2019 - September 30, 2020
  • Recurrence: Recurring daily
  • Location: 21c Museum Hotel
  • Address: 200 NE A street
    Bentonville, 72712

The black steel gates of Homeland Security were conceived by Peruvian artist Jota Castro in 2002 as a satirical critique of President George W. Bush’s creation of the Department of Homeland Security. Topped by razor wire and resting on moveable wheels, the artwork symbolizes both the power and futility of Bush’s act: the agency can detain and deport anyone perceived as a threat to the U.S., but cannot guarantee security for American residents or visitors. Castro, who served as a diplomat at the United Nations and the European Union for twenty years before becoming an artist-activist, has long exposed the fallacies and failures of nationalist socio-political systems. Nearly two decades later, his work articulates a potent, prescient vision of our contemporary condition: a world experiencing a massive refugee crisis in which borders are shrunk and shut, and routes to freedom and opportunity have shifted and narrowed into barriers.

Refuge